Film and Video School

If you are looking for a means to get into the business of making movies, film and video school is just one way. After all, a film and video school is where you learn all about movie making and what it takes to make a film garner relative success in this too-often fickle industry.

But before you decide to commit yourself to two, maybe four, years of film and video school (not to mention that tens of thousands of dollars it’s going to cost you), there are a lot of things to consider.

Is film and video school what you need to achieve your career goals?

While it is true that attending a film and video school can help you get to where you want to be in the film industry. You can learn all the theoretical and technical aspects of filmmaking by attending classes and hands-on practical workshops and going to forums attended by speakers who are veterans in the film industry. But a film and video school is only one way of achieving your dream of working with movies.

For instance, if your career goal is to become adept at video editing, then you are better off getting some practical experience in a junior editing job and then you can just work your way up from there. Nothing is more valuable than hands-on experience.

However, if, on the other hand, it is your goal to become a director, then there are certain things about directing that you can only learn from the classroom. A film and video school offers you several directing methods and a chance to apply any one of those once you get to work in your own student film.

So always keep your career goal in mind when deciding whether or not to attend a film and video school.

How to Choose a Film and Video School

Once you have decided that film and video school is the right choice, then time for you to start shopping for schools. Treat it as you would with any other generic school. Factors such as reputation, credentials, faculty, and facilities are four significant points to keep in mind.

Reputation, because you don’t want to attend just any school and spend all those thousands of dollars only to find out that nobody in the film industry has even heard of your school. Believe us, it pays to have at least a well-known film and video school. Who knows, some of the people you’d end up working with were alumni. That’s common ground that you can work on.

Moreover, always choose a film and video school that puts emphasis on practical exercises than theoretical discussions. So a good film and video school should have an editing lab or at least access to one, equipment, preview rooms, etc.